Showing posts with label MyNotes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label MyNotes. Show all posts

Monday, June 30, 2014

MyNotes - Digital Leadership 8: Professional Growth and Development


Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.



Howdy...I skipped Chapter 7 on Branding in this series...you may want to buy the book to get access to some of the neat ideas about how to establish a brand for your school. If you'd like to find out what the rest of the book has to say, I encourage you to buy it! It's a must-read for school leaders!

My Notes


  1. It is essential for principals and school leaders to develop professional learning networks both within and beyond their local organizations.
  2. A connected leader is still supported by traditional networks but now has the ability to tap into other professional learning resources using digital tools.
  3. "It's hard to describe how great the impact of my PLN has been," Lyn Hilt states. "I am definitely a changed leader because of the connections and relationships I've formed. There's nothing like needing support or an idea and reaching out to hundreds, even thousands, of other educators for feedback. I've been introduced to ideas and content I never would have learned through traditional professional development. Forming a PLN is a necessity for any school leader who wishes to grow professionally" [exponentially?]
  4. There is no cost for this powerful opportunity to grow...all it costs is an investment of time, which we ultimately determine. Leaders who embrace a digital style understand this investment is necessary to create the types of schools needed to prepare students for a digital world...leaders must put in the time.
This is my last entry on this great book. While my first impressions focused on how it echoed messages we've encountered via other books and authors--mainly that getting connected with social media is powerful growth agent that transforms--my impression has evolved to appreciate the specific examples and how this message has manifested itself in Eric's work.

There's a lot more to read in the book and I hope you'll consider reading the book



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Saturday, June 28, 2014

MyNotes - Digital Leadership 6: Public Relations

Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.

My Notes

  1. A new system of learning that is differentiated and that connects to student passions and strengths must be made a reality. Teaching and learning need to transform to something yet undefined. [or is it defined already but not well-distributed?]
  2. Digital Leadership is about building the capacity to create a solid foundation for positive public relations using social media that complements communication efforts.
  3. It empowers leaders to become the storytellers-in-chief and creates a constant flow of information that highlights and focuses on schoolwide success and positive culture.
  4. Social media allow leaders to create  unique communities [using free tools that everyone uses rather than forcing a walled garden] for their schools/districts, establish a digital presence, construct feedback mechanisms on web sites and other space, and welcome stakeholders into a conversation.
  5. Digital public relations might look like this:
    1. Principal's report or district newsletter
    2. Twitter updates
    3. Facebook page
    4. Video tools
    5. Blogs
  6. As leaders begin to integrate social media...this transparency gives stakeholders a clearer picture of all of the many positive things taking place each and every day.



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Friday, June 27, 2014

MyNotes- Digital Leadership 5: Communication

Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.

My Notes

  1. Digital leaderships demands that we reach our stakeholders through the use of tools and social spaces...it calls for a hybrid construct of communication techniques that blends the traditional methods mentioned with the systematic use of social media tools to create a dynamic, two-way system that will increase engagement with all stakeholders.
  2. Four key principles that lay a foundation for communicating effectively with parents:
    1. transparency
    2. honesty
    3. accessibility
    4. flexibility
  3. Strategies:
    1. Make your professional email/twitter accounts available.
    2. Create your own web site and include contact information, your availability to meet with or speak to parents, extra help hours, student assignments, press, etc.
    3. Hold training workshops for parents.
    4. Call home on both positive and negative issues.
    5. Share as many student and teacher accomplishments and success stories as possible.
    6. Setup a separate phone number for parents using GoogleVoice.
    7. Make resources readily available for parents using a social bookmarking service.
    8. Always return parent phone calls and emails in a timely fashion
    9. Invite parents into your classrooms and schools.
    10. Develop a school Facebook page to advertise events and provide up-to-date school info.
    11. Institute a positive referral policy and make parents aware when their child is recognized.
    12. Start a blog, let parents know about it, and encourage them to comment on your posts.
    13. Look for other means to reach stakeholders. Create a paperless environment using ZippSlip.com
  4. True home/school partnerships call for communication to include plenty of two-way options, not just one-way sharing.



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Thursday, June 26, 2014

MyNotes: Digital Leadership 4: Leading with Technology

Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.

MyNotes - Chapter 4: Leading with Technology
  1. "Leading in a culture of changes means creating a culture (not just a structure) of change..." it means producing the capacity to seek, critically access, and selectively incorporate new ideas and practices--all the time, inside the organization as well as outside it."-Michael Fullan as cited
  2. There is no room for isolation. Failure to comprehend the role and expectations of each team member, from the leader down to the lowest-ranking soldier, increases the risk of failure.
  3. Britten's motto is "Leading out loud" - use social networking and blogging to model both professional learning and transparent leadership for his administrative team. These tools become effective methods for communicating the concerns of the district regarding legislation and funding priorities, but also ensure that everyone throught the district has real-time updates of information needed to join the effort...it also models the skills students can use as they develop their own advocacy roles.
  4. 3 years ago, "being a technology leader meant making sure our computer labs were up to date and available for staff to use when needed. The notion of using social media was never a thought, since the perception was that it lacked any potential value for learning or education in general."
  5. For my school, connectedness was the original catalyst for change...enabling us to form numerous collaborative partnerships with an array of stakeholders who have assisted us along the way.
  6. One of the drawbacks to educational technology is the perceived lack of value it has in terms of student learning and achievement...with current reform efforts...the value of technology in the eyes of many has diminished or is nonexistent.
  7. The true value of technology rests on how it is used to support learning and create experiences that students find meaningful and relevant.
  8. It wasn't until I addressed my technology fears head on and then began to model technology's effective use that many of our initiatives began to flourish.
  9. Embracement, rather than "buy-in," is attained through empowerment and autonomy...we empower teachers to shift their instructional practices and giving them the needed autonomy to take risks and work on effective integration techniques designed to instrinsically motivate them to change.
  10. Some Guiding questions:
    1. How can educators and schools effectively use free social media tools to communicate important information to stakeholders in real time?
    2. How can leaders take control of their public relations and product a constant stream of positive news?
    3. How can leaders connect with experts and peers across the globe to grow professionally through knowledge acquisition, resources sharing, and engaged discussion, and to receive feedback?
  11. Small changes result in significant changes.
    1. philosophical enlightenment as to the educational value of Web 2.0 technologies
      1. effectively communicating with stakeholders
      2. a consistent public relations platform and brand presence
      3. authentically engaging students in learning process
      4. cost-effective PD that is meaningful
      5. rethinking how the learning environment was structured
    2. education staff on value of web 2.0 technologies
    3. realizing that students had to be instrumental in any effort to transform the culture of our school
    4. becoming a more transparent administrator and sharing the innovative practices taking place within the walls of my school




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Monday, June 23, 2014

MyNotes - Tech Implementation Study for Superintendents

The following notes come from the June 2014 School Administrator magazine which feature an abstract of a 2013 doctoral study by Dr. Sharon M. Biggs. You can find it on page 39 of School Administrator. The full doctoral study can be found online.


Some quick reflections:

  1. I very much enjoyed Dr. Biggs' literature review, and the points made about first-order and second-order change. As a Technology Director, first-order changes (technical in nature) appear the easiest place to show growth quickly. Second-order changes (changing teacher attitudes about blending technology into instruction) are the hard part.
  2. Some of the important findings or conclusions included these,which I wholeheartedly agree with and I would encourage technology directors to apply to themselves, not just their superintendents (or help the super to "get it"):
    1. Provide leadership based on technology plans.
    2. Conduct frequent needs assessments to ensure currency and sustainability
    3. Develop committees of stakeholders that can help with technology planning
    4. the need for superintendents to be empathetic and understanding that systemic change can cause high levels of anxiety for some people, therefore, a portion of stakeholders will "get on the train kicking and fighting." The superintendents agreed that they must still make hard decisions about technology implementation based on what is best for their students, despite knowing there might be pockets of staff and community members who oppose and try to sabotage plans for technology implementation. 
    5. It is important for superintendents to take time to learn and understand the history, culture, and dynamics of their school districts before deploying technology plans


My Notes
  1. 2013 doctoral study at Seton Hall University explored common barriers superintendents face that influence their district technology leadership.
  2. The findings included the following:
    1. lack of sufficient financial and technology resources
    2. resistance by stakeholders to change their traditional and/or date district cultures and mindsets about integrating technology in 21st-century classrooms
    3. The purpose of the study was to gain an understanding of superintendents' beliefs about technology leadership barriers and about how superintendents engage in technology leadership practices.
    4. Superintendents understand their critical technology leadership roles and they try to remain actively engaged and involved through-out the different phases of technology implementation.
  3. The following notes come from the doctoral study itself:
    1. The federal government provided a compelling argument about technology being an essential ingredient of economic growth and job creation (U.S. Department ofEducation, 2006). 
    2. Some researchers believe superintendents are key driving forces behind the technological development of American students. Others argue that technologically developed students are essential if we want to have a technologically advanced America. 
    3. Houston (2001, p. 429) explained that superintendents are aware they "can change the trajectory of children's lives, alter the behavior of organizations, and expand the possibilities ofwhole communities." This statement supports the idea that superintendents are considered the primary leaders of  transformational and adaptive (Heifetz, Grashow & Linsky, 2009) technological development within school districts. 
    4. Gibson (2001, p. S02) said "the number one issue in the effective integration of educational technology into the learning environment is not the preparation of teachers for technology usage but the presence of informed and effective leadership ....
    5. Valdez (2004) claims district leaders need to "know and utilize instructional technology ... (1) to prepare students to function in an information-based, Internet-using society; (2) to make students competent in using tools found in almost all work areas; and (3) to make education more effective and efficient"
    6. Abrams and Russell (2004) found that 93.4% of the principals they surveyed placed heavy importance on technology implementation, however, only 40.5% of the respondents indicated they were successfully implementing technology in their schools.
    7. Despite the existence of potential technology leadership barriers, school leaders believe technology implementation is important, and they engage in efforts to effectively lead technology implementation in schools.
    8. According to Ausband (2006, p. 16), there are district-level barriers that hinder technology integration, and those barriers can influence the technology leadership practices and behaviors of district superintendents.
    9. The role of superintendents as instructional leaders is to inspire other district stakeholders to create a systemic shared vision for transformational technology implementation. This involves the consistent engagement with and communication about the integration and implementation processes. 
    10. Superintendents should also form. collaborative strategic plans for developing student technology literacy since they are the key technology vision-setting leaders in districts. 
    11. Superintendents are now required to posture themselves as student learning advocates at the local, state, and national levels to garner resources to help support technology implementation that can impact technology integration and usage in their districts (iste.org, 2012).
    12. Instructional leaders must consistently promote technology-based professional learning communities to help improve instructional practices at the classroom level.
    13. leaders should facilitate and participate in technology-driven learning communities and study groups, use digital tools to model effective communication and collaboration, stay current on educational research about new technologies, and be well versed regarding technology implementation benchmarks (iste.org, 2012). 
    14. District leaders are expected to recruit, hire, and retain technologically literate and proficient staffs that effectively use technology resources and tools to advance the operational and academic vision and mission of the district.
    15. there is an expectation American superintendents will provide district technology leadership that will help develop student technology literacy skills.
    16. district superintendents must now remain actively engaged during the processes of technology access, implementation, integratio~ and literacy development so they can hold principals and teachers accountable at the building level (Lim & Khine, 2006)
    17. Changing teachers' attitudes and beliefs, and teachers' knowledge and skills require second-order change efforts because the areas are reflective of ingrained cultural norms. 
    18. Many of our administrators are novice technology users and have gained little experience or training in the knowledge and skills needed to be effective leaders. Even though administrators understand the importance of implementing and supporting technology use...the development of technology leadership skills seems to be left to chance.
    19. School boards of education sometimes sign off on district technology spending before ensuring that superintendents fully understand the first-order change (infrastructure and hardware) and second-order change (shifts in mindsets, practices, and district cultures) implications the technology implementation and integration can have on an entire school system.
    20. The superintendent's own level of technology proficiency and beliefs about technology implementation can influence how effectively he or she overcomes first-order and second-order technology leadership barriers.
    21. Superintendents must "identify their own technological skills and address their needs with training" (Braswell & Childress, 2001, pp. 473-474).
    22. theory of"deliverology:"
      1. Develop a foundation for delivery - 
        1. a) Define an aspiration, which includes setting measurable goals; 
        2. b) Review the current state ofdelivery, which involves conducting a needs assessment; 
        3. c) Build the delivery unit, which fosters the idea of building the capacity of a group of implementation vanguards who will help push forward the implementation initiative, and 
        4. d) Establish a guiding coalition that can remove barriers to change, influence and support the unit's work at crucial moments, and provide counsel and advice; which involves developing a coalition ofdiverse stakeholders who will assist with the change effort
      2. Understand the delivery challenge
        1. a) Evaluate past and present performance, which involves bridging past practices with current target goals; and 
        2. b) Understand drivers of performance and relevant systems activities, which includes helping stakeholders understand the impact of variables that can drive student learning.
      3. Plan for delivery
        1. a) Determine your reform strategy, which involves developing a collaborative and fluid strategic plan for implementation; 
        2. b) Set targets and trajectories, which includes setting realistic and measurable success targets for different groups affected by the implementation, and 
        3. c) Produce delivery plans, which entails developing plans that are works in progress
      4. Drive delivery ­
        1. a) Establish routines to drive and monitor performance, which includes clearly defining roles and responsibilities; 
        2. b) Solve problems early and rigorously, when involves dealing with issues as soon as they occur, and 
        3. c) Sustain and continually build momentum, which includes persisting through implementation and not getting side-tracked by barriers.
    23. a superintendent's embrace of a technology implementation initiative is not necessarily a guarantee that all other stakeholders within a district community will immediately or ever embrace the technology implementation initiative. 
    24. Weick (1982) might say that superintendents who lead technology implementation initiatives stand the risk ofbeing ineffective ifthey attempt to treat school districts as "tightly coupled systems" where everyone acts upon an initiative the same way, at the same time, and from the same vantage point; similar to what one might see in a factory assembly line or departmentalized business (faylor, 1911). Thus, superintendents might need to accept the reality that school districts are loosely coupled as they attempt to overcome technology leadership barriers during implementation.
    25. Superintendents as adaptive leaders must build bridges between existing ways of doing things and thinking (first-order change) and new required ways ofthin king and doing things (second-order change).
    26. Superintendents might face first-order change and second-order change barriers that can interrupt well laid out intentions and plans for leading adaptive and sustainable technology initiatives. 
      1. First-order changes tend to be of a technical nature and the keen adaptive leader should work toward bridging the gap between existing approaches and new approaches. 
      2. Second­ order changes have to do with attitudes, beliefs, values, and cultural norms; and can present bigger challenges to the superintendent who is expected to lead adaptive technology implementation in a district.
    27. superintendents who want to effectively lead second-order technology implementation changes should: 
      1. (a) deliberately orchestrate ongoing collaborative conversations about the implementation process; 
      2. (b) avoid relying on absolutes during the process and foster an environment of experimentation; 
      3. (c) encourage the acceptance ofdiverse technology platforms, proficiency levels, values and opinions about technology; 
      4. (d) stick with implementation plans that work and toss plans that peter out, and 
      5. (e) recognize the association between technical problems and solutions and adaptive challenges and solutions, but be able to distinguish between the two.




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Thursday, June 19, 2014

MyNotes: Leaders of Learning @4sergiovanni

Book
Leaders of Learning: How District, School, and Classroom Leaders Improve Student Achievement
by Robert J. Marzano, Richard DuFour

A colleague--@4sergiovanni--prevailed upon me to buy a copy of Leaders of Learning by DuFour and Marzano, and I decided to buy it for Kindle rather than the usual Barnes and Noble or print copy. I'm amazed at how easy it is to highlight and share content from the book to Twitter and/or Facebook. You can see my shares, along with what others are discussing online by searching Twitter for the hashtag #leadersoflearning.

Below are my take-aways as I work through the book, in reverse order (most recent ones first). I'll be adding more over time.

  • In their meta-analysis of sixty-nine studies conducted from 1978 to 2001, Marzano et al. (2005) found that the average correlation in studies conducted in the United States indicates that principal leadership has a significant and positive relationship with student achievement. Since then other studies have arrived at this same conclusion (see Robinson, 2007). In short, a justifiable conclusion one can glean from the research is that the more skilled the building principal, the more learning can be expected among students.
  • A Communications Audit for the Central Office 
    • What systems have been put in place in our district to ensure priorities are addressed in each school? 
    • Do we have systems for clarifying what students must learn? 
    • Do we have systems for monitoring student learning? 
    • Do we have systems for responding when students have difficulty? 
    • Do we have systems for enriching and extending learning for students who are proficient? Do we have systems for monitoring and supporting teams? 
    • Do we have systems for providing each teacher and team with the timely information essential to continuous...
  • “communication pathways are the veins and arteries of new ideas” (Kouzes & Posner, 1987, p. 56). Effective district leaders engage with stakeholders (Mourshed et al., 2010). They are eager to initiate dialogue, and they develop formal and informal strategies for soliciting the perspectives of others. They are hungry for feedback so they can make adjustments and course corrections.
  • educators throughout North America are suffering from what Doug Reeves (2011) has called “initiative fatigue” as they grapple with the multitude of fragmented, disconnected, short-term projects that sap their energy.
  • One of the biggest impediments to improving schools is the unmanageable number of initiatives pursued by the central office and the total lack of coherence among those initiatives (Olson, 2007).
  • prior to asking teams to establish a SMART goal, a principals’ meeting would be devoted to helping principals articulate a rationale for SMART goals; gather the tools, templates, and resources they could use to help their teams complete this task; and rehearse a crucial conversation with a team that balks at establishing SMART goals.
  • Visit www.allthingsplc.info for a glossary
  • If district leaders are to succeed in building a common language, they should identify the key terms people throughout the organization must understand in order to move forward; directly teach those terms through description, explanation, and examples; engage staff in discussions of the terms; and periodically assess levels of understanding.
  • effective SMART goals for teams will focus on concrete evidence of student learning.
  • Electronic teams use technology to create powerful partnerships with colleagues across the district, the state, or the world.
  • fundamental questions that drive the work of a PLC (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many, 2010): • 
  • What is it we want our students to know?
  • How will we know if they are learning?
  • How will we respond when individual students do not learn?
  • How will we enrich and extend the learning for students who are proficient?
  • A collaborative team in a PLC is a group of people working interdependently to achieve a common goal for which members are mutually accountable. In the absence of interdependence, one or more common goals, and mutual accountability, a group cannot be a team.
  • effective professional development for individual educators will ultimately “be judged by its capacity for building (and building on) professional community” (Little, 2006
  • “isolation is the enemy of improvement” (Elmore, 2003)
  • the most powerful form of teacher accountability according to the study “came from peers through collaborative practice. By developing a shared concept of what good practice looks like, and basing it on a fact-based inquiry into what works best to help students learn, teachers hold each other accountable” 
  • the time principals devote to building the capacity of teachers to work in collaborative teams is more effective than time spent attempting to supervise individual teachers into better performance through the traditional classroom observation and evaluation process (DuFour & Marzano, 2009).
  • The design of work in schools is fundamentally incompatible with the practice of improvement. Teachers spend most of their time working in isolation from each other in self-contained classrooms. . . . The problem with this design is that it provides almost no opportunity for teachers to engage in continuous and sustained learning about their practice in the setting in which they actually work. . . . This disconnect between the requirements of learning to teach well and the structure of teachers’ work life is fatal to any sustained process of instructional improvement.



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Tuesday, June 17, 2014

MyNotes - Digital Leadership 3: Keys to Leading Sustainable Change

Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.


MyNotes - Chapter 3: Keys to Leading Sustainable Change

  1. Shares the example of Dr. Spike Cook, who realized the benefits of sharing his personal insights as a principal, husband, father and teacher...his blog facilitated the development and communication of his shared vision through conveying the image of his ultimate educational setting.
  2. Prior to his social media transformation, Dr. Cook would send out a weekly email (e.g. Monday Memo, Friday Focus). Afterwards, he created a weekly update blog and included videos, pictures, and relevant information carefully designed to increased learning and 21st century skills as they told the story of the school.
  3. Spike has never mandated technology integration. . .he feels that modeling is the effective leadership route to help his teachers grow. He rewards teachers who take risks and supports all teachers in what they need to be successful.
  4. Many of our shools are broken because our techniques have not shifted in line with societal changes.
  5. Michael Fullan's Six Secrets of Change:
    1. Love Your Employees - Trust and support them unconditionally.
    2. Connect Peers with Purpose - allow teachers to have a voice in the decision-making process and to craft how policies and mandates will be implemented.
    3. Capacity Building Prevails - the effectiveness of distributed leadership resides in the human potential available to be released within an organization, an emergent property of a group or network of individuals in which group members pool their expertise.
    4. Learning is the Work - leaders must not only be creative in finding time to engage in PD during the day, but consistently model lifelong learning themselves.
    5. Transparency Rules - Sharing more information will increase engagement in the change process.
    6. Systems Learn
  6. Potential Roadblocks
    1. "This is too hard."
    2. "I don't have the time for this."
    3. Lack of collaboration. ("Together we are better")
    4. Directive approach. Model effectively rather than tell someone to do it.
    5. Hierarchy in schools.
    6. No support. 
    7. Fear of Change
    8. Naysayers and antagonists.
    9. Poor professional development.
    10. Frivolous purchases.
  7. Digital leadership is a change in professional behavior that will pave the way to create a more relevant school through the seamless integration of 21st century tools...it's about changing the way we do things that will transform school culture to better meet the needs of all stakeholders in the digital age.


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Monday, June 16, 2014

MyNotes - Digital Leadership 2: Why Schools Must Change

Note: Over the next few weeks, I'll be reading Eric Scheninger's book, Digital Leadership. Eric was kind enough to send me a copy and I'll be sharing my notes and thoughts as I work my way through it. I'm honored that Eric sent me a print copy to read and share my thoughts on. Comments in square brackets are mine, the rest is the author's.

MyNotes - Chapter 2: Why Schools Must Change

  1. [In this chapter, the author explores the reasons why standardization resulted and how its lasting effect has a deleterious effect on teaching and learning.]
  2. "A focus on standardization narrows the curriculum and creates a teaching culture where creativity, exploration and critical thinking are scarce or non-existent."
  3. It creates a culture that students disdain; one that can only be sustained with the use of "if-then" rewards or "carrots and sticks."
  4. This entrenched system produces students who lack creativity, are fearful of failure, work extemely hard to follow directions and are leaving schools with obsolete skills in a postindustrial society.
  5. Schools focus on linear, sequential, left-brain thinking in a world that requires both left- and right-brain capabilities.
  6. Digital leadership is about establishing a vision and implementing a strategic process that creates a teaching and learning culture that provides students with essential skill sets: creativity, communication, collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, technological proficiency and global awareness.
  7. Every sector, every job, every employee today has had to respond to twenty-first century changes, often because of new technologies [but teachers haven't...and neither have central office staff who write curriculum for teachers to use in classrooms, perpetuating the issues].
  8. Failures:
    1. We build policy based on old paradigms
    2. Still work in silos
    3. Lack strategies to build consistent capacity to use new pedagogies and tools
    4. Fail to imagine a future that will substantively different than yesterday or today.
  9. As leaders, we must question at every opportunity our commitment to sustaining practices that need to be abandoned for the sake of contemporary learners.
  10. People live today in "a culture of participation plus technologies plus networks." Examples:
    1. High school seniors in Pam's district conversed via Skype with an Egyptologist in Cairo.
    2. Kindergarten children in 2 different schools explored J words in a lesson cotaught by teachers and educator from Michigan via Twitter.
    3. Commenting on first and third graders' blogs
    4. Live broadcast of three schools' winter orchestra concerts via Ustream.
  11. A learner can end up in a state-of-the-art-school facility where pedagogy still remains command and control, driven by a one to some teaching model through curricula, assessment and instructional standardization minimize opportunities for young people to pursue interests, passions and possibilities.
  12. Leaders must focus on solutions rather than problems.
    1. Succumbing to the negative rhetoric
    2. abiding by the status quo
    3. having a bunker mentality
  13. Digital leadership emphasizes the need for current leaders to be catalysts to drive sustainable change that will transform school culture.
  14. Every student can and should learn, and educators must learn how to push us [leaders] to become even better.
  15. Strategic planning process:
    1. Why involves convincing all stakeholders why a school needs to change.
    2. What is the content of the change, built through a common focus.
    3. Where defines the location and direction.
    4. How is the process of change and involves determining how to change the school once people understand and embrace the why, what and where.
  16. Encouraging a 21st Century pedagogy involves incorporating the four Cs:
    1. Creativity
    2. Communication
    3. Critical Thinking
    4. Collaboration
  17. Leaders have to make concerted efforts to see where educational technology aligns well to the curriculum and pedagogy.
  18. Expanding Evidence Approaches for Learning in a Digital World from USDOE...review the report and collaboratively revise your curriculum to incorporate the right technology to emphasize essential skills necessary for today's learners to excel beyond the building walls.
  19. Authentic problems provide a meaningful and relevant context for learning.
  20. Through problem-based learning, students learn how to use an interative process of assessing what they know, identifying what they need to know, gathering information, and collaboration on the evaluation of hypotheses in light of the data they have collected (Stepien & Gallagher, 1993). [love the reference to problem-based learning]
  21. Students are using technology to solve problems outside of school...
  22. Great quote from Seth Godin (Linchpin, 2010):
    1. Every day I meet people who have so much to give but have been bullied enough or frightened enough to hold it back. It's time to stop complying with the system and draw your own map. You have brilliance in you, your contribution is essential, and the art you create is precious. Only you can do it, and you must.
    2. Digital leadership is about inspiring students and teachers to think rather than follow rulebooks and ace tests...building a plan to lead schools differently in the digital age, and then doing something about it [emphasis mine].
  23. Digital leadership is about discovering, recognizing and taking advantage of the many opportunities that the digital age presents...leaders have to be outliers to initiate and sustain the type of change needed in our schools.
  24. The NASSP identified the following ten guidelines (only six are shown) to assist school leaders:
    1. Principals must effectively and consistently model the use of the same technology tools they expect teachers to use in their classrooms with the students.
    2. Principals must be consistent in their decisions and expectations about integrating learning technology in the school.
    3. The principal's communication about the pace and process of integrating learning technology needs to be clear and resonable.
    4. The principal must provide appropriate professional development time and resources to support effective classroom implementation of technology.
    5. The principal must support early adopters and risk takers.
    6. The principal must do whatever it takes to ensure that all staff has early access to the very same digital tools that students will be using in their classrooms.
  25. The author used UStream to share a funeral service to facilitate mourning by family members, as well as stream sessions at an event.
  26. These examples prove the following:
    1. Technology increases engagement and serves as a conduit to endless possibilities that can enhance every facet of what we do in education.
    2. It is not a frivolous expense that is unworthy of the investments that many pretend it to be.
    3. How should we use technology available to us to improve what we do?
  27. Digital leadership relies heavily on technology as a conduit for change.
Reflections
Much of the changes the author shares in this chapter emphasizes the communication changes technology can facilitate.



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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin's blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure