Amazon.com Providing Guidebooks for Pedophiles?

Find out more about Guidebook on Red-Eared Slider Turtles

Apparently, the answer is Yes, that's exactly what Amazon.com is doing. Lots of issues elaborated on in this Anderson-Cooper YouTube video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sKmyHvdKsY4) so be sure to check out the video. This came to my attention via Plurk.

While Amazon.com has clearly crossed the line in terms of providing pedophile related content, a few questions come up:

  1. Should Amazon.com be policing it's own inventory  (e.g. Apple App store for iPod/iPad type involvement) or serving as a passthrough for content (e.g. club membership that anyone can access content)?
  2. Should Amazon.com be held liable for inappropriate or illegal content? If so, which country decides what's appropriate and/or legal? What's illegal in one country might be perfectly OK elsewhere.
  3. Where does the First Amendment (U.S. Constitution) factor in?
What do I think? It's simple--pedophile stuff should be kicked off the site and Amazon.com should pay a fine for not only providing the content online for sale--and presumably making money off of it--but also for building a community around this Amazon-hosted content.

And, shouldn't this be a digital citizenship issue for corporations like Amazon?





PingIt!
Delicious Bookmark this on Delicious
Subscribe to Around the Corner-MGuhlin.org


Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin's blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure

Comments

tim holt said…
Miguel, an interesting conversation, taken from PLurk.

You seem to have a cut and dried answer that Amazon should be held accountable for allowing disgusting (I agree) material. No doubt that books about pedophilia are bad news. Only perverts would disagree. But the larger issue here is, I suppose, what is "objectionable?"

Here is information on bomb building: http://www.amazon.com/Workshop-Explosives-Second-Uncle-Fester/dp/0970148542/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1292438736&sr=8-1

Here is information on anal sex:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=anal+sex&x=0&y=0

Here are books on how to make MEth:
http://www.amazon.com/Secrets-Methamphetamine-Manufacture-Uncle-Fester/dp/0915179555/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1292438861&sr=8-1

The point is, whose standards are we applying here?
All of my examples are objectionable to someone somewhere.

Interesting debate.
Tim Holt said…
My response:

http://snipurl.com/1nlwk9
Miguel Guhlin said…
Tim, I read your blog entry and found nothing objectionable in it. That said, I don't have any objections to a global bookstore making content available to folks that may be acceptable to one, obscene to another. *I* am not proposing a boycott of Amazon, although I recognize the right of folks to enact their beliefs withholding their financial support.

Pedophile stuff appears, Amazon should pay fines.

Other stuff you mention, I don't care.

Should I care? That's a different type of conversation. Let's just say, I don't want to read any of the books you linked to, I respect and support the rights of those who DO want to, because that's America--freedom.

Pedophilia, and/or child molestation, is wrong wherever one finds it. Amazon is a business and accountable, just like the evening newscaster is when images of naked children are found on his computer.

Popular posts from this blog

#Chromecast Add-Ons to Play Various Video File Formats

Free Professional Learning! Education On Air #googleedu

10 Steps to a Blended Learning Classroom #MIEexpert #MIE #tceamie1