DiigoNotes - School budget cuts even worse next year


Image Source: http://fld.ustc.edu.cn/BritishPoetry/poets/images/Ozymandias.jpg


Recently, a tech director I know was sharing with me how many positions she would lose as a result of NCLB Title 2, Part D (Enhancing Education through Technology) cuts. With 10 staff members, she would lose 3 people funded via T2PD. "If that's not bad enough," she pointed out with a wry smile, "if the Texas budget projections get any worse, the state technology allotment might go, too." And, as I quickly surmised, lose of the state technology allotment would spell disaster for Instructional Technology staff members across Texas, perhaps eliminating entire ed-tech programs altogether and severely under-cutting the support school districts can provide to maintain the thousands of computers in Texas public schools today.


One of my commenters on Buzz pointed out that it's not Obama's fault that NCLB Title 2 Part D is being cut. Rather, it is Congress' responsibility. It honestly feels that after years of tearing down the infrastructure--the slippery slope mentioned only a few pages into in George Lakoff's Don't Think of an Elephant--for Education Service Centers, school districts, diverting funds to private and charter schools, leaving the public school system--the system for the "rest of them" that lack--in the hole. Consider the following assertion by Gary Orfield (Source: Democracy Now):
Basically, what we find is that although public schools have become much more segregated since the Supreme Court changed the law in the 1990s, charter schools are vastly more segregated than that; and that it’s segregation not just by race, but also by poverty; and that there are not only segregated black schools and some segregated Latino schools, but there’s also segregated white schools that overrepresent whites in some states, including California, and some of which have no—appear to have no free lunch facility. So, basically, the system of choice that’s used here doesn’t have the civil rights protections that good magnet schools have, for example. And the Bush administration, as it pushed the growth of these policies, really stopped trying to enforce civil rights in this movement. . .I was surprised by the emergence of what appear to be white flight schools. You know, there was a Supreme Court decision back in the 1960s that said if you create a new school district and it increases segregation, it violates the Constitution.
As we look forward to budget cuts, I can't help but wonder if the only ones in public schools will be...let's see here...ah yes, here is my adaptation of Emma Lazarus' poem...


Unlike the brazen giant of Ozymandias fame,
Whose overweening hubris--in time--made the proud, lame.
Here in our dirty city streets, faded doors open against futility
A beleaguered teacher with a pencil perched, whose words
Kindle the heart, spanning the unfair fjords
From her ink-stained hands, luminescent tenderness
Bearing a precious, oh so precious, load with gentleness.

"Keep charter schools, your storied pomp!" cries she
With silent lips. "Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to be free,
The wretched rejects of your white-flight, locked doors.
Send these, the homeless, whatever the cost, to me.
For them, I give, endure all beside the faded classroom door!"





Budget cuts...








    • Survey: School budget cuts even worse next year

      57 percent of school leaders say they’ll have to delay tech purchases in 2010-11, up from 29 percent this year



    • Although the economy has begun to rebound, K-12 education leaders say they are still facing serious budget shortfalls for the coming school year that threaten their ability to implement new technologies


    • Released April 8, Cliff Hanger: How America’s Public Schools Continue to Feel the Impact of the Economic Downturn,” the latest in a series of national surveys from the American Association of School Administrators (AASA), identifies a number of key challenges that are compounding an already grave situation.


    • And though President Obama’s federal budget plan for fiscal year 2011 requests $4 billion more for education than the previous year, the administration is proposing to shift a greater percentage of federal dollars from formula-based grants to competitive grants—a move that school leaders fear will further squeeze their limited resources.


    • “The economic downturn persists at the state and local levels, a reality that needs to be considered as Congress and the Obama administration move forward with both the federal budget process and the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act,” said Dan Domenech, AASA’s executive director. “Our members were clear in articulating their concern about the cessation of [stimulus] dollars, the proposed level funding for IDEA and Title I, and the significant shift to competitive grants within the federal education funding process.”


    • “The economic downturn persists at the state and local levels, a reality that needs to be considered as Congress and the Obama administration move forward with both the federal budget process and the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act,” said Dan Domenech, AASA’s executive director. “Our members were clear in articulating their concern about the cessation of [stimulus] dollars, the proposed level funding for IDEA and Title I, and the significant shift to competitive grants within the federal education funding process.”


    • The survey, which polled 453 school administrators in March, found that the economic climate of school systems doesn’t reflect the recovery beginning to take hold in other sectors. In fact, school budget cuts will be noticeably more significant for 2010-11 than they were in the previous two years, the survey suggests.


    • Fifty-seven percent of respondents said they plan to delay technology purchases in 2010-11, up from 29 percent in 2009-10. Half of respondents said they plan to delay or eliminate instructional improvement strategies next year, up from 22 percent in 2009‐10.
      Despite an influx of stimulus money, two-thirds of school leaders (68 percent) said they were forced to cut personnel in 2009-10—and 90 percent anticipate having to do so in 2010-11.


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