Sunday, July 19, 2009

Open Source Software In the Military

Educators continue to ignore the value of free, open source software except in specific situations. In the midst of a changing world, we need to rethink how we approach our work in schools. Paying expensive software licensing fees, refusing to change our own practices because we're comfortable with the way things work now are two roadblocks to bringing free software into schools. Another roadblock often cited, according to my conversations with network directors, in considering the adoption of open source in schools is security.

If K-12 education isn't willing to sacrifice these two costly approaches to satisfy the needs of its customers--the children served--then maybe it's time to take a look at the military and reflect that if the military can change to meet its needs, why can't education?
With the advent of forge.mil, etc. the military seems to be getting on board with free and open source software. A working group meeting is going to be held at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, August 12-13, 2009. There's a pretty good lineup of speakers including a Marine from the Iraq-Marine Expeditionary Forces, who was on the ground and saw the agility open source gave to him and his soldiers.
Source: Slashdot Technology Story | Open Source Software In the Military

However, the Defense Department sees open source as a way to cut costs and boost security, and it wants more of it. (C-Net 2008).

Hmm....

1 comment:

featheredflowers said...

I agree. Please check out my second book, Open Source Opens Classrooms available through Amazon. There are administrators that still think children have to learn with Excel and other proprietary products because nothing else is like it. Learning to adapt, understand, and use a spreadsheet is much more important than who made the program. Which do you prefer your children learn?

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Everything posted on Miguel Guhlin's blogs/wikis are his personal opinion and do not necessarily represent the views of his employer(s) or its clients. Read Full Disclosure